Articles | Volume 14, issue 9
The Cryosphere, 14, 2795–2807, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-2795-2020
The Cryosphere, 14, 2795–2807, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-2795-2020

Research article 01 Sep 2020

Research article | 01 Sep 2020

Warm-air entrainment and advection during alpine blowing snow events

Nikolas O. Aksamit and John W. Pomeroy

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Latest update: 17 Oct 2021
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Short summary
In cold regions, it is increasingly important to quantify the amount of water stored as snow at the end of winter. Current models are inconsistent in their estimates of snow sublimation due to atmospheric turbulence. Specific wind structures have been identified that amplify potential rates of surface and blowing snow sublimation during blowing snow storms. The recurrence of these motions has been modeled by a simple scaling argument that has its foundation in turbulent boundary layer theory.