Articles | Volume 14, issue 4
The Cryosphere, 14, 1425–1435, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-1425-2020
The Cryosphere, 14, 1425–1435, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-1425-2020

Brief communication 30 Apr 2020

Brief communication | 30 Apr 2020

Brief communication: CESM2 climate forcing (1950–2014) yields realistic Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance

Brice Noël et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (16 Jan 2020) by Xavier Fettweis
AR by Brice Noël on behalf of the Authors (21 Jan 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (23 Jan 2020) by Xavier Fettweis
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (05 Feb 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (14 Feb 2020)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (14 Feb 2020) by Xavier Fettweis
AR by Brice Noël on behalf of the Authors (11 Mar 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (18 Mar 2020) by Xavier Fettweis
AR by Brice Noël on behalf of the Authors (23 Mar 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (24 Mar 2020) by Xavier Fettweis

Post-review adjustments

AA: Author's adjustment | EA: Editor approval
AA by Brice Noël on behalf of the Authors (23 Apr 2020)   Author's adjustment   Manuscript
EA: Adjustments approved (27 Apr 2020) by Xavier Fettweis
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Short summary
We present a reconstruction of historical (1950–2014) surface mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet using the Community Earth System Model (CESM2; ~111 km) to force a high-resolution regional climate model (RACMO2; ~11 km), which is further refined to 1 km spatial resolution. For the first time, an Earth-system-model-based product, assimilating no observations, can reconstruct realistic historical ice sheet surface mass balance as well as the mass loss acceleration that started in the 1990s.