Articles | Volume 12, issue 11
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-3577-2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-3577-2018
Research article
 | 
19 Nov 2018
Research article |  | 19 Nov 2018

What historical landfast ice observations tell us about projected ice conditions in Arctic archipelagoes and marginal seas under anthropogenic forcing

Frédéric Laliberté, Stephen E. L. Howell, Jean-François Lemieux, Frédéric Dupont, and Ji Lei

Viewed

Total article views: 2,626 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
1,648 900 78 2,626 354 65 75
  • HTML: 1,648
  • PDF: 900
  • XML: 78
  • Total: 2,626
  • Supplement: 354
  • BibTeX: 65
  • EndNote: 75
Views and downloads (calculated since 07 Mar 2018)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 07 Mar 2018)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 2,626 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 2,361 with geography defined and 265 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Latest update: 20 Jul 2024
Download
Short summary
Ice that forms over marginal seas often gets anchored and becomes landfast. Landfast ice is fundamental to the local ecosystems, is of economic importance as it leads to hazardous seafaring conditions and is also a choice hunting ground for both the local population and large predators. Using observations and climate simulations, this study shows that, especially in the Canadian Arctic, landfast ice might be more resilient to climate change than is generally thought.