Articles | Volume 12, issue 7
The Cryosphere, 12, 2401–2411, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-2401-2018
The Cryosphere, 12, 2401–2411, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-2401-2018

Research article 24 Jul 2018

Research article | 24 Jul 2018

Modelled fracture and calving on the Totten Ice Shelf

Sue Cook et al.

Data sets

IceBridge HiCARS 2 L2 Geolocated Ice Thickness, Version 1 D. D. Blankenship, S. D. Kempf, and D. A. Young https://doi.org/10.5067/9EBR2T0VXUDG

IceBridge Photon Counting Lidar L1B Unclassified Geolocated Photon Elevations D. D. Blankenship, S. D. Kempf, D. A. Young, and L. E. Lindzey https://doi.org/10.5067/U3E4Q5WWVSP9

Model code and software

Capabilities and performance of Elmer/Ice, a new-generation ice sheet model O. Gagliardini, T. Zwinger, F. Gillet-Chaulet, G. Durand, L. Favier, B. De Fleurian, R. Greve, M. Malinen, C. Martín, P. Räback, J. Ruokolainen, M. Sacchettini, M. Schäfer, H. Seddik, and J. Thies https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-6-1299-2013

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Short summary
The growth of fractures on Antarctic ice shelves is important because it controls the amount of ice lost as icebergs. We use a model constructed of multiple interconnected blocks to predict the locations where fractures will form on the Totten Ice Shelf in East Antarctica. The results show that iceberg calving is controlled not only by fractures forming near the front of the ice shelf but also by fractures which formed many kilometres upstream.