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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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TC | Articles | Volume 12, issue 6
The Cryosphere, 12, 2159–2165, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-2159-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
The Cryosphere, 12, 2159–2165, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-2159-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 27 Jun 2018

Research article | 27 Jun 2018

Sunlight, clouds, sea ice, albedo, and the radiative budget: the umbrella versus the blanket

Donald K. Perovich

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Don Perovich on behalf of the Authors (11 Jun 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (12 Jun 2018) by John Yackel
AR by Don Perovich on behalf of the Authors (15 Jun 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
The balance of longwave and shortwave radiation plays a central role in the summer melt of Arctic sea ice. It is governed by clouds and surface albedo. The basic question is what causes more melting, sunny skies or cloudy skies. It depends on the albedo of the ice surface. For snow-covered or bare ice, sunny skies always result in less radiative heat input. In contrast, the open ocean always has, and melt ponds usually have, more radiative input under sunny skies than cloudy skies.
The balance of longwave and shortwave radiation plays a central role in the summer melt of...
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