Articles | Volume 11, issue 1
The Cryosphere, 11, 303–317, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-11-303-2017
The Cryosphere, 11, 303–317, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-11-303-2017

Research article 30 Jan 2017

Research article | 30 Jan 2017

The past, present, and future viscous heat dissipation available for Greenland subglacial conduit formation

Kenneth D. Mankoff and Slawek M. Tulaczyk

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Status: closed
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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Kenneth Mankoff on behalf of the Authors (01 Sep 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (12 Sep 2016) by Olivier Gagliardini
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (27 Sep 2016)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (27 Sep 2016)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (04 Oct 2016)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (11 Oct 2016) by Olivier Gagliardini
AR by Anna Mirena Feist-Polner on behalf of the Authors (30 Nov 2016)  Author's response
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (07 Dec 2016) by Olivier Gagliardini
AR by Kenneth Mankoff on behalf of the Authors (10 Jan 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (12 Jan 2017) by Olivier Gagliardini
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Short summary
There may be a ~ 7-fold increases in heat at the bed of Greenland by the end of the century due to increased runoff. The impact this will have on the ice is uncertain, but recent results indicate more heat may reduced glacier velocity near the margin, and accelerate it in the interior. We used existing model output of Greenland surface melt, ice sheet surface, and basal topography. All code needed to recreate the results, using free software, is included.