Articles | Volume 11, issue 6
The Cryosphere, 11, 3023–3034, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-11-3023-2017
The Cryosphere, 11, 3023–3034, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-11-3023-2017

Research article 21 Dec 2017

Research article | 21 Dec 2017

How much should we believe correlations between Arctic cyclones and sea ice extent?

Jamie G. L. Rae et al.

Data sets

The ERAInterim reanalysis: Configuration and performance of the data assimilation system D. P. Dee, S. M. Uppala, A. J. Simmons, et al. https://doi.org/10.1002/qj.828

Global analyses of sea surface temperature, sea ice, and night marine air temperature since the late nineteenth century Rayner, N. A., D. E. Parker, E. B. Horton, C. K. Folland, L. V. Alexander, D. P. Rowell, E. C. Kent, and A. Kaplan https://doi.org/10.1029/2002JD002670

The Met Office Hadley Centre sea ice and sea surface temperature data set, version 2 H. A. Titchner and N. A. Rayner https://doi.org/10.1002/2013JD020316

Model code and software

The Met Office Global Coupled model 2.0 (GC2) configuration K. D. Williams, C. M. Harris, A. Bodas-Salcedo, et al. https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-8-1509-2015

TRACK 1.4.0 K. Hodges http://www.nerc-essc.ac.uk/~kih/TRACK/Track.html

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Short summary
Several studies have highlighted links between Arctic summer storms and September sea ice extent in observations. Here we use model and reanalysis data to investigate the sensitivity of such links to the analytical methods used, in order to determine their robustness. The links were found to depend on the resolution of the model and dataset, the method used to identify storms and the time period used in the analysis. We therefore recommend caution when interpreting the results of such studies.