Articles | Volume 11, issue 4
The Cryosphere, 11, 1851–1878, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-11-1851-2017
The Cryosphere, 11, 1851–1878, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-11-1851-2017

Research article 08 Aug 2017

Research article | 08 Aug 2017

Sea-level response to melting of Antarctic ice shelves on multi-centennial timescales with the fast Elementary Thermomechanical Ice Sheet model (f.ETISh v1.0)

Frank Pattyn

Viewed

Total article views: 3,891 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
2,164 1,585 142 3,891 116 161
  • HTML: 2,164
  • PDF: 1,585
  • XML: 142
  • Total: 3,891
  • BibTeX: 116
  • EndNote: 161
Views and downloads (calculated since 30 Jan 2017)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 30 Jan 2017)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 3,590 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 3,567 with geography defined and 23 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Discussed (final revised paper)

Discussed (final revised paper)

Discussed (preprint)

Latest update: 18 Oct 2021
Download
Short summary
Marine Ice Sheet Instability is a mechanism that can potentially lead to collapse of marine sectors of the Antarctic ice sheet and floating ice shelves play a crucial role herein. Improved grounding line physics (interaction with subglacial sediment) are implemented in a new ice-sheet model and compared to traditional sliding laws. Ice shelf collapse leads to a significant higher sea-level contribution (up to 15 m in 500 years) compared to traditional grounding-line approaches.