Journal cover Journal topic
The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 4.713 IF 4.713
  • IF 5-year value: 4.927 IF 5-year
    4.927
  • CiteScore value: 8.0 CiteScore
    8.0
  • SNIP value: 1.425 SNIP 1.425
  • IPP value: 4.65 IPP 4.65
  • SJR value: 2.353 SJR 2.353
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 71 Scimago H
    index 71
  • h5-index value: 53 h5-index 53
Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2020-176
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2020-176
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  27 Jul 2020

27 Jul 2020

Review status
This preprint is currently under review for the journal TC.

Ice loss in High Mountain Asia and the Gulf of Alaska observed by CryoSat-2 swath altimetry between 2010 and 2019

Livia Jakob1, Noel Gourmelen1,2,3, Martin Ewart1, and Stephen Plummer4 Livia Jakob et al.
  • 1Earthwave Ltd, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ, United Kingdom
  • 2School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH8 9XP, United Kingdom
  • 3IPGS UMR 7516, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, Strasbourg, 67000, France
  • 4European Space Agency, ESA-ESTEC, Noordwijk, 2201 AZ, Netherlands

Abstract. Glaciers and ice caps are currently the largest non-steric contributor to sea level rise, contributing ~30 % to sea level budget. Global monitoring of these regions remains a challenging task since global estimates rely on a variety of observations and models to achieve the required spatial and temporal coverage, and significant differences remain between current estimates. Here we report the first application of a novel approach to retrieve spatially-resolved elevation and mass change from Radar Altimetry over entire mountain glaciers areas. We apply interferometric swath altimetry to CryoSat-2 data acquired between 2010 and 2019 over High Mountain Asia (HMA) and in the Gulf of Alaska (GoA). In addition, we extract monthly time series of elevation change, exploiting CryoSat's high temporal repeat, to reveal seasonal and multiannual variation in rates of glaciers' thinning at unprecedented spatial detail. We find that during this period, HMA and GoA have lost an average of −27.9 ± 2.4 Gt yr−1 (−0.29 ± 0.03 m w.e. yr−1) and −76.3 ± 5.6 Gt yr−1 (−0.89 ± 0.07 m w.e. yr−1) respectively, corresponding to a contribution to sea level rise of 0.048 ± 0.004 mm yr−1 and 0.217 ± 0.015 mm yr−1. Glacier thinning is ubiquitous except for the Karakoram-Kunlun region experiencing stable or slightly positive mass balance. In the GoA region the intensity of thinning varies spatially and temporally and correlates with the strength of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. In HMA we observe sustained multiannual trends until 2015-6, and decreased loss or even mass gain from 2016-17 onwards.

Livia Jakob et al.

Interactive discussion

Status: open (until 21 Sep 2020)
Status: open (until 21 Sep 2020)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Livia Jakob et al.

Livia Jakob et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 397 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
273 118 6 397 18 2 5
  • HTML: 273
  • PDF: 118
  • XML: 6
  • Total: 397
  • Supplement: 18
  • BibTeX: 2
  • EndNote: 5
Views and downloads (calculated since 27 Jul 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 27 Jul 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 319 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 319 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Saved

No saved metrics found.

Discussed

No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 12 Aug 2020
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Glaciers and ice caps are currently the largest contributor to sea level rise. Global monitoring of these regions is a challenging task and significant differences remain between current estimates. This study looks at glacier changes in High Mountain Asia and the Gulf of Alaska using a new technique, which for the first time makes the use of satellite radar altimetry for mapping ice mass loss over mountain glacier regions possible.
Glaciers and ice caps are currently the largest contributor to sea level rise. Global monitoring...
Citation