Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2022-237
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2022-237
 
13 Dec 2022
13 Dec 2022
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal TC.

Brief Communication: Rapid ~335 106 m3 bed erosion after detachment of the Sedongpu Glacier (Tibet)

Andreas Kääb and Luc Girod Andreas Kääb and Luc Girod
  • Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, 0316, Norway

Abstract. Following the 130 106 m3 detachment of the Sedongpu Glacier (south-eastern Tibet) in 2018, the Sedongpu valley
underwent drastic and rapid large-volume landscape changes. Between 2018 and 2022, and in particular during summer
2021, an enormous volume of in total ~335±5 106 m3 was eroded from the former glacier bed, forming a new canyon of up
to 300 m depth, 1 km width and almost 4 km length. The mass was transported into the Yarlung Tsangpo (Brahmaputra)
River and further. Several rock-ice avalanches of in total ~150±5 106 m3 added to the total rock, sediment and ice volume of
over 0.6 km3 that were exported from the basin since around 2017.

Andreas Kääb and Luc Girod

Status: open (until 07 Feb 2023)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse

Andreas Kääb and Luc Girod

Andreas Kääb and Luc Girod

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Short summary
Following the detachment of the 130 million cubic-meter Sedongpu Glacier (south-eastern Tibet) in 2018, the Sedongpu valley underwent drastic large-volume landscape changes. An enormous volume of in total around 330 million cubic-metres was rapidly eroded, forming a new canyon of up to 300 m depth, 1 km width and almost 4 km length. Such consequences of climate change in glacierized mountains have so far not been considered at this magnitude and speed.