Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2021-292
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2021-292

  22 Sep 2021

22 Sep 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal TC.

A Distributed Temperature Profiling System for Vertically and Laterally Dense Acquisition of Soil and Snow Temperature

Baptiste Dafflon1, Stijn Wielandt1, John Lamb1, Patrick McClure1, Ian Shirley1, Sebastian Uhlemann1, Chen Wang1, Sylvain Fiolleau1, Carlotta Brunetti1, F. Hunter Akins1, John Fitzpatrick1, Samuel Pullman2, Robert Busey3, Craig Ulrich1, John Peterson1, and Susan S. Hubbard1 Baptiste Dafflon et al.
  • 1Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
  • 2Independent, Oakland, CA 94501, USA
  • 3University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA

Abstract. Measuring soil and snow temperature with high vertical and lateral resolution is critical for advancing the predictive understanding of thermal and hydro-biogeochemical processes that govern the behavior of environmental systems. Vertically resolved soil temperature measurements enable the estimation of soil thermal regimes, freeze/thaw layer thickness, thermal parameters, and heat and/or water fluxes. Similarly, they can be used to capture the snow thickness and the snowpack thermal parameters and fluxes. However, these measurements are challenging to acquire using conventional approaches due to their total cost, their limited vertical resolution, and their large installation footprint. This study presents the development and validation of a novel Distributed Temperature Profiling (DTP) system that addresses these challenges. The system leverages digital temperature sensors to provide unprecedented, finely resolved depth-profiles of temperature measurements with flexibility in system geometry and vertical resolution. The integrated miniaturized logger enables automated data acquisition, management, and wireless transfer. A novel calibration approach adapted to the DTP system confirms the factory-assured sensor accuracy of +/−0.1 °C and enables improving it to +/−0.015 °C. Numerical experiments indicate that, under normal environmental conditions, an additional error of 0.01 % in amplitude and 70 seconds time delay in amplitude for a diurnal period can be expected, owing to the DTP housing. We demonstrate the DTP systems capability at two field sites, one focused on understanding how snow dynamics influence mountainous water resources, and the other focused on understanding how soil properties influence carbon cycling. Results indicate that the DTP system reliably captures the dynamics in snow thickness, and soil freezing and thawing depth, enabling advances in understanding the intensity and timing in surface processes and their impact on subsurface thermal-hydrological regimes. Overall, the DTP system fulfills the needs for data accuracy, minimal power consumption, and low total cost, enabling advances in the multiscale understanding of various cryospheric and hydro-biogeochemical processes.

Baptiste Dafflon et al.

Status: open (until 17 Nov 2021)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on tc-2021-292', Anonymous Referee #1, 22 Oct 2021 reply

Baptiste Dafflon et al.

Baptiste Dafflon et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 205 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
164 37 4 205 2 2
  • HTML: 164
  • PDF: 37
  • XML: 4
  • Total: 205
  • BibTeX: 2
  • EndNote: 2
Views and downloads (calculated since 22 Sep 2021)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 22 Sep 2021)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 203 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 203 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 22 Oct 2021
Download
Short summary
This study presents the development and validation of a novel acquisition system for measuring finely resolved depth-profiles of soil and snow temperature at multiple locations. Results indicate that the system reliably captures the dynamics in snow thickness, and soil freezing and thawing depth, enabling advances in understanding the intensity and timing in surface processes and their impact on subsurface thermal-hydrological regimes.