Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2021-266
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2021-266

  20 Sep 2021

20 Sep 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal TC.

High-resolution subglacial topography around Dome Fuji, Antarctica, based on ground-based radar surveys conducted over 30 years

Shun Tsutaki1,2, Shuji Fujita1,3, Kenji Kawamura1,3,4, Ayako Abe-Ouchi1,2, Kotaro Fukui5, Hideaki Motoyama1,3, Yu Hoshina6, Fumio Nakazawa1,3, Takashi Obase2, Hiroshi Ohno7, Ikumi Oyabu1, Fuyuki Saito8, Konosuke Sugiura9, and Toshitaka Suzuki10 Shun Tsutaki et al.
  • 1National Institute of Polar Research, Research Organization of Information and Systems, Tachikawa 190-8518, Japan
  • 2Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8564, Japan
  • 3Department of Polar Science, The Graduate University of Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Tachikawa 190-8518, Japan
  • 4Japan Agency for Marine Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), Yokosuka 237-0061, Japan
  • 5Tateyama Caldera Sabo Museum, Toyama 930-1405, Japan
  • 6Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601, Japan
  • 7Kitami Institute of Technology, Kitami 090-8507, Japan
  • 8Japan Agency for Marine Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), Yokohama 236-0001, Japan
  • 9Faculty of Sustainable Design, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555, Japan
  • 10Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560, Japan

Abstract. The retrieval of continuous ice core records of more than 1 Myr is an important challenge in palaeo-climatology. For identifying suitable sites for drilling such ice, the knowledge of the subglacial topography and englacial layering is crucial. For this purpose, extensive ground-based ice radar surveys were done over Dome Fuji in the East Antarctic plateau during the 2017–2018 and 2018–2019 austral summers by the Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition, on the basis of ground-based radar surveys conducted over the previous ~ 30 years. High-gain Yagi antennae were used to improve the antenna beam directivity and thus attain a significant decrease in hyperbolic features in the echoes from mountainous ice-bedrock interfaces. We combined the new ice thickness data with the previous ground-based data, recorded since the 1980s, to generate an accurate high-spatial-resolution (up to 0.5 km between survey lines) ice thickness map. This map revealed a complex landscape composed of networks of subglacial valleys and highlands, which sets substantial constraints for identifying possible locations for new drilling. In addition, our map was compared with a few bed maps compiled by earlier independent efforts based on airborne radar data to examine the difference in features between sets of the data.

Shun Tsutaki et al.

Status: open (until 25 Nov 2021)

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Shun Tsutaki et al.

Shun Tsutaki et al.

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Short summary
We constructed an ice thickness map across the Dome Fuji region, East Antarctica, from the improved radar data and previous data collected since the late 1980s. The data acquired using the improved radar systems allowed basal topography to be identified with higher accuracy. The new ice thickness data show the bedrock topography, particularly the complex terrain of subglacial valleys and highlands south of Dome Fuji, with substantially high detail.