Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2020-324
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2020-324

  04 Jan 2021

04 Jan 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal TC.

Multiscale Variations in Arctic Sea Ice Motion, Links to Atmospheric and Oceanic Conditions

Dongyang Fu, Bei Liu, Yali Qi, Guo Yu, Haoen Huang, and Lilian Qu Dongyang Fu et al.
  • School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Guangdong Ocean University, Zhanjiang, Guangdong, China

Abstract. Arctic sea ice drift motion affects the global material balance, energy exchange and climate change and seriously affects the navigation safety of ships along certain channels. Due to the Arctic's special geographical location and harsh natural conditions, observations and broad understanding of the Arctic sea ice motion of sea ice are very limited. In this study, sea ice motion data released by the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) were used to analyze the climatological, spatial and temporal characteristics of the Arctic sea ice drift from 1979 to 2018 and to understand the multiscale variation characteristics of the three major Arctic sea ice drift patterns. The results show that the sea ice drift velocity is greater in winter than in summer. The empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis method was used to extract the three main sea ice drift patterns, which are the anticyclonic sea ice drift circulation pattern on the scale of the Arctic basin, the average sea ice transport pattern from the Arctic Ocean to the Fram Strait and the transport pattern moving ice between the Kara Sea (KS) and the northern coast of Alaska. By using the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) method, each temporal coefficient series extracted by the EOF method was decomposed into multiple time-scale sequences. We found that the three major drift patterns have 4 significant interannual variation periods of approximately 1, 2, 4 and 8 years. Furthermore, the second pattern has a significant interdecadal variation characteristic with a period of approximately 19 years, while the other two patterns have no significant interdecadal variation characteristics. Combined with the atmospheric and oceanic physical environmental data, the results of the correlation analysis show that the first EOF sea ice drift pattern is mainly affected by atmospheric environmental factors, the second pattern is affected by the joint action of atmospheric and oceanic factors, and the third pattern is mainly affected by oceanic factors. Our study suggests that the ocean environment also has a significant influence on sea ice movement. Especially for some sea ice transport patterns, the influence even exceeds atmospheric forcing.

Dongyang Fu et al.

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on tc-2020-324', Anonymous Referee #1, 06 Jan 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Bei Liu, 11 Jan 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on tc-2020-324', Anonymous Referee #2, 08 Feb 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Bei Liu, 04 Mar 2021

Dongyang Fu et al.

Dongyang Fu et al.

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Short summary
Our results show three main sea ice drift patterns have different multiscale variation characteristics. The oscillation period of the third sea ice transport patterns is longer than other two, and ocean environment has a more significant influence on it. This is due to the different regulatory effects of the atmosphere and ocean environment on sea ice drift patterns on various scales. Our research can provide a basis for the study of Arctic sea ice dynamics parameterization in numerical models.