Journal cover Journal topic
The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

IF value: 4.713
IF4.713
IF 5-year value: 4.927
IF 5-year
4.927
CiteScore value: 8.0
CiteScore
8.0
SNIP value: 1.425
SNIP1.425
IPP value: 4.65
IPP4.65
SJR value: 2.353
SJR2.353
Scimago H <br class='widget-line-break'>index value: 71
Scimago H
index
71
h5-index value: 53
h5-index53
Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2020-257
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2020-257
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  27 Oct 2020

27 Oct 2020

Review status
This preprint is currently under review for the journal TC.

Measuring the state and temporal evolution of glaciers using SAR-derived 3D time series of glacier surface flow

Sergey Samsonov1, Kristy Tiampo2, and Ryan Cassotto2 Sergey Samsonov et al.
  • 1Canada Centre for Mapping and Earth Observation, Natural Resources Canada, 560 Rochester Street, Ottawa, ON K1S5K2 Canada
  • 2Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 USA

Abstract. The direction and intensity of glacier surface flow adjust in response to a warming climate, causing sea level rise, seasonal flooding and droughts, changing landscapes and habitats. However, until recently no single technique could consistently measure the evolution of surface flow for an entire glaciated region in three-dimensions with high temporal and spatial resolutions. We have developed such a technique and use it to map, in unprecedented detail, the temporal evolution of five glaciers in southeastern Alaska (Agassiz, Seward, Malaspina, Klutlan and Walsh) during 2016–2020. We observe seasonal and interannual variations and the maximum horizontal and vertical flow velocity in excess of 1000 and 200 m/year, respectfully. We also observe culminating phases of surging at Klutlan and Walsh glaciers and confirm that Agassiz, Seward and Malaspina glaciers continue to adjust to a warming climate. On a broader scale, this technique can be used for reconstructing the response of worldwide glaciers to the warming climate using nearly 30 years of archived SAR data and for near real-time monitoring of these glaciers using rapid revisit SAR data from satellites, such as Sentinel-1 (6 days revisit period) and forthcoming NISAR (12 days revisit period).

Sergey Samsonov et al.

Interactive discussion

Status: open (until 31 Dec 2020)
Status: open (until 31 Dec 2020)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Sergey Samsonov et al.

Sergey Samsonov et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 266 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
174 89 3 266 12 1 1
  • HTML: 174
  • PDF: 89
  • XML: 3
  • Total: 266
  • Supplement: 12
  • BibTeX: 1
  • EndNote: 1
Views and downloads (calculated since 27 Oct 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 27 Oct 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 233 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 231 with geography defined and 2 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Saved

No saved metrics found.

Discussed

No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 27 Nov 2020
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
The direction and intensity of glacier surface flow adjust in response to a warming climate, causing sea level rise, seasonal flooding and droughts, changing landscapes and habitats. We developed a technique that measures the evolution of surface flow for an entire glaciated region in three-dimensions with high temporal and spatial resolutions and used it to map the temporal evolution of five glaciers in southeastern Alaska (Agassiz, Seward, Malaspina, Klutlan and Walsh) during 2016–2020.
The direction and intensity of glacier surface flow adjust in response to a warming climate,...
Citation