Journal cover Journal topic
The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 4.713 IF 4.713
  • IF 5-year value: 4.927 IF 5-year
    4.927
  • CiteScore value: 8.0 CiteScore
    8.0
  • SNIP value: 1.425 SNIP 1.425
  • IPP value: 4.65 IPP 4.65
  • SJR value: 2.353 SJR 2.353
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 71 Scimago H
    index 71
  • h5-index value: 53 h5-index 53
Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2020-210
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2020-210
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  31 Jul 2020

31 Jul 2020

Review status
This preprint is currently under review for the journal TC.

Characterization of Titan Dome, East Antarctica, and potential as an ice core target

Lucas H. Beem1, Duncan A. Young2, Jamin S. Greenbaum2, Donald D. Blankenship2, Jingxue Guo3, and Sun Bo3 Lucas H. Beem et al.
  • 1Department of Earth Sciences, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717, USA
  • 2Institute for Geophysics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78758, USA
  • 3Polar Research Institute of China, Shanghai 200136, China

Abstract. Titan Dome is located about 200 km from the South Pole along the 180◦ meridian within the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. Based on sparse data, it is a region that is identified as having a higher probability of containing ice that would capture the middle Pleistocene transition (1.25 to 0.7 Ma) as a paleoclimate proxy. New aerial geophysical observations collected over Titan Dome were used to characterize the region and assess its suitability as a paleoclimate ice core site. The radar coupled with an available ice core age model enabled the tracing of isochronal layers throughout the region which also served as constraints on basal ice age modeling. The results of the survey revealed new basal topographic detail, constrained the location of Titan Dome, which differs between community datasets, and suggests that the basal ice beneath Titan Dome is too young to be relevant to study of the middle Pleistocene transition.

Lucas H. Beem et al.

Interactive discussion

Status: open (until 25 Sep 2020)
Status: open (until 25 Sep 2020)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Lucas H. Beem et al.

Lucas H. Beem et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 158 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
112 45 1 158 1 0
  • HTML: 112
  • PDF: 45
  • XML: 1
  • Total: 158
  • BibTeX: 1
  • EndNote: 0
Views and downloads (calculated since 31 Jul 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 31 Jul 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 85 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 85 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Saved

No saved metrics found.

Discussed

No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 12 Aug 2020
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Radar observation collected above Titan Dome of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet is used to describe ice geometry and test a hypothesis that ice beneath the dome is older than 1 million years. An important climate transition occurred between 1.25 million and 700 thousand years ago and if ice old enough to study this period can be removed as an ice core, new insights into climate dynamics are expected. The new observations suggests the deep ice is too young, more likely 300 to 800 thousand years old.
Radar observation collected above Titan Dome of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet is used to describe...
Citation